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Character Evidence

Character EvidenceTo a person unfamiliar with the criminal justice system in Los Angeles, they might assume that a criminal trial involves a lot of time establishing the “character” of the defendant and the witnesses. In reality, most of the rules of evidence focus on establishing the facts relevant to a violation of the law, and discussions of character are limited. Evidence Code § 1100 states that evidence of a person’s character may be admitted in the form of opinion, reputation, and specific instances. This seems to open up a great deal of categories for exploration, but most rules and cases limit § 1100, rather than expanding it.

Evidence Code § 1324 does allow a witness to discuss a person’s reputation in the community, generally limited to the witness’s reputation for truthfulness. Reputation can be made up of specific observations, but also rumor, speculation, and hearsay. § 1324 allows evidence of reputation to be admitted over a hearsay objection, but does not allow the witness to discuss the specific acts that led to the development of the reputation. Reputation can actually even be discussed as a lack of evidence. If the witness never heard bad things about a person, that can be evidence that they generally behaved well, or peacefully.

Evidence Code § 1103

In a criminal case, the prosecution brings a case against a person, and that person may be represented by a defense attorney. Character evidence requires a great deal of strategy and finesse, as character evidence can backfire if used carelessly. Evidence Code § 1103(a)(1) allows a defendant to attack the character of a victim. A defendant in a battery case may want to show that a victim who claimed to have been attacked is actually a violent person that attacks others frequently. This may be powerful evidence to suggest that the defendant may be the real victim. However, Evidence Code § 1103(a)(2) allows the prosecution to come back with evidence showing that the alleged victim was a peaceful person.

Evidence Code § 1103(b) then allows the prosecution to bring up negative character evidence about the defendant, but only after the defense has attacked the victim’s character. So, if a defendant accuses the victim of being violent through use of character evidence, the prosecution may then use character evidence to show that the defendant is a violent person. This is true even if the character evidence would have been inadmissible before the defense attacked the victim’s character. This is sometimes referred to as “opening the door,” as evidence that has been kept out may come pouring through the door once the defense opens it by attacking the victim’s credibility.

Issues of character can even arise with a hearsay declarant. Even if a person is not testifying, if statements of that person are repeated in court, this can lead to conflicting evidence regarding the character of a person who never appears in court. This is also a danger if the defense is able to introduce a hearsay statement provided by the defendant, without the defendant testifying. This may seem like a good strategy, but could lead to negative character evidence being introduced against the defendant.

Effective use of Character Evidence

Character evidence must be used carefully, with the entire case strategy in mind. It takes an experienced defense attorney to weigh the benefits of attacking the alleged victim with the risks of a counter-attack from the prosecution. Further complication can arise in domestic violence cases, as character evidence can be layered on family dynamics, with possible relatives as witnesses, and loyalties and past grudges affecting issues of reputation and opinions about character.

Even attacking the credibility of a stranger in a barroom brawl can lead to an outpouring of positive evidence for that person once their character is attacked. Even though using character evidence can be complicated and dangerous, an experienced defense attorney can use such evidence to great effect. Even the anticipated counter-attack from the prosecution can be used to paint a story that eventually leads to a not guilty for an accused person.

If you or a loved one is accused of a crime, it is very important that you discuss your case with a Los Angeles Attorney immediately. As a former Deputy District Attorney with over 14 years of prosecutorial experience, Lawyer Michael Kraut is highly skilled in the use of character evidence and effectively presenting testimony.

For more information about issues of character in criminal law, and to schedule your free consultation, contact Michael Kraut at the Kraut Law Group located at 6255 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 1520, Los Angeles, CA 90028. Mr. Kraut can be reached 24/7 at 888-334-6344 or 323-464-6453.

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Michael Kraut is outstanding! He genuinely cared about my case and instructed my mom and I throughout the entire process. He was very clear on what he needed in order to receive the best results. He kept us updated until the end. I thank him so much for getting my charges rejected. I highly recommend him to anyone with legal needs! Shaquan
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I contacted Michael with concern for my personal and business reputation. He was very reassuring and confident the entire time. After about 3 weeks it was determined that no charges were being filed by any agency and I was in the clear of any investigation. One thing that is amazing is just how FAST Michael is at replying to phone calls, texts, and even emails! We are talking under 30 minutes in most cases. That is unheard of for most attorneys! Michael is incredible and not your typical run of the mill attorney. For best results hire him if you feel like you might be under investigation or could face charges. Even if you know you are innocent it is best to take care of the smoke before it becomes a fire. Brad
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Michael Kraut is-hands down-the best criminal defense attorney and I can't begin to thank him for all that he did for me and my family. I reached out to him in the middle of the night and less than a couple hours later, he had gotten back to me and scheduled a meeting. He's a no-nonsense attorney who knows how to get the job done! From the second we retained him, I had peace of mind in knowing that we were in the best hands possible. If Michael Kraut couldn't get it done, I knew that it couldn't be done at all. You can't put a price tag on your freedom. He was worth every single penny. Lida
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Michael Kraut is an outstanding attorney. He was extremely professional, and straightforward, yet sensitive with my case. I am confident I made the right choice by hiring Michael. I highly recommend him to anyone seeking a truly experienced lawyer. Daniel
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Michael Kraut - I cannot thank you enough for all that you did for ​my son. When I came to you I read that you used to be a district attorney but I never knew how much that meant until I watch you in court. I knew it took 3 months but the final day when I heard the judge say that all charges were dismissed it was all worth it! I will always be grateful for all that you did for us. A.N.